An alarming picture emerges as Eskom’s liquidity dries up

The reports states that without any further funding, Eskom will have approximately R1,2-billion of liquid assets at the end November 2017 against a target of R20-billion, and will move into a negative liquidity position of approximately R5-billion by end of January 2018. This figure assumes the successful draw-down of R2,2-billion from development finance institution (DFI) loans and R1,3-billion export credit agency (ECA) facilities.

The report further states that the qualified audit opinion in Eskom’s 2016/17 annual financial statements relating to irregular expenditure, governance issues and changes in leadership has had a negative impact on investor sentiment, which is affecting the volume of future funding, current drawdowns and liquidity position of Eskom…

Eskom’s financial position

The report indicates that at 30 September 2017 Eskom Group revenue of R95,5-billion was R3,75-billion lower than budget.

This was attributed to lower than budgeted electricity sales volumes, the capitalisation of pre-commissioning revenue at Medupi and Kusile, and revenue of R2,64-billion deemed uncollectible at the date of sale.

Eskom indicates that average demand from key industrial customers remains low, with no recovery in demand or sales. Average demand for these customers has declined further to approximately 8200 MW during the past quarter, from an average of 8500 MW in the first quarter of the financial year, mainly due to customers’ response to higher winter electricity tariffs.

Primary energy costs were underspent by R3,87-billion across all main categories of coal, OCGTs, IPPs and international purchases.

The group’s operating expenditure (excluding depreciation and amortisation) of R25,3-billion was R4,7-billion below budget, as a result of underspend on employee benefit costs and other operating expenses.

Group capital expenditure amounted to R24,2-billion for the period, which is substantially lower than the budget of R31,8-billion due to underspend mainly at Kusile, Medupi and other power delivery projects, partially due to phasing of expenditure. Much of the capital spend shortfall is however expected to be incurred by year end.

Poor governance – a core issue highlighted in the report

The report highlights that the audit qualification in Eskom’s 2016/17 financial statements relating to irregular expenditure, governance related issues and continuous changes in executive management has had a severe impact on Eskom’s ability to raise funding in the domestic and foreign markets and has also resulted in delays in drawdowns on existing facilities.

Eskom says this will have a negative impact on financial sustainability and its status as a going concern.

The report identifies that in order to improve both liquidity and execution of funding initiatives, it is critical that governance related issues and investigations are resolved, and that stability returns within Eskom’s board and executive management.

Investors indicate that they are heavily reliant on these issues being resolved before any firm commitments on funding will be made.

Rating agencies have also indicated their deep concerns regarding governance and leadership at Eskom, and are closely monitoring the execution of the funding initiatives. Any further downgrades would exacerbate the current situation and put at risk the execution of Eskom’s funding plan.

Note: This article is a collaboration between EE Publishers and Fin24.

Here is the link to the article

Leave a Reply